The connect() method provided by the Mongoose supports both JavaScript promises and async-await syntax.

The following example demonstrates how you can use promises to create a connection with MongoDB:

const mongoose = require('mongoose');

const server = '127.0.0.1:27017'; // REPLACE WITH YOUR OWN SERVER
const database = 'test';          // REPLACE WITH YOUR OWN DB NAME

mongoose.connect(`mongodb://${server}/${database}`, {
    useNewUrlParser: true,
    useUnifiedTopology: true,
    useFindAndModify: false,
    useCreateIndex: true
}).then(() => {
    console.log('MongoDB connected!!');
}).catch(err => {
    console.log('Failed to connect to MongoDB', err);
});

To use async-await syntax, you need to write an asynchronous function, as shown below:

const mongoose = require('mongoose');

const server = '127.0.0.1:27017'; // REPLACE WITH YOUR OWN SERVER
const database = 'test';          // REPLACE WITH YOUR OWN DB NAME

const connectDB = async () => {
    try {
        await mongoose.connect(`mongodb://${server}/${database}`, {
            useNewUrlParser: true,
            useUnifiedTopology: true,
            useFindAndModify: false,
            useCreateIndex: true
        });

        console.log('MongoDB connected!!');
    } catch (err) {
        console.log('Failed to connect to MongoDB', err);
    }
};

connectDB();

Take a look at this article to learn more about setting up a MongoDB connection in Node.js.

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